Permission & mobile-marketing

We’ve all read over the years many different explanations of what mobile marketing is, what can be done with it, and seen some case studies of cool and successful campaigns. Usually, these explanations follow a pretty similar pattern. The benefits of the media are described (personal, fast, ubiquitous, interactive, etc.), common use-cases are mentioned (customer acquisition&retention, sales promotion, direct marketing, crm, loyalty, etc.), technologies are described and somewhat hyped (mms, streaming video, lbs, etc.), and estimates of the market are given. This should all be familiar, so I won’t talk about these things. Instead I’d like to point out one important area that I think doesn’t get the attention it deserves.

Permission marketing

Gathering a committed audience that is willing to listen to you over time is, in my opinion, one of the most valuable marketing activities you can do. When using mobile technology as the channel for acquiring and activating this permission base, many of benefits of mobile marketing can be reaped. We’ve noticed that when combining an opt-in option as a part of a mobile campaign (i.e. when you’ve already gotten the dialogue going with an end-user), the opt-in percentages can be surprisingly high (of course there is substantial variation between different demographic segments, but when targeted correctly, the results are amazing).

A mobile strategy

But building a permission base is of course not enough. In order to maximize the potential of the permission base, you need to have a well thought out longer-term strategy on the activities targeted to the permission base. This is something we work on with many of our customers on a daily basis. Seth Godin has a good book on permission marketing that all marketers should read; it applies well on mobile marketing. Most of the mobile-marketing case-studies I’ve seen don’t analyze the longer term benefits of permission marketing, I’m however sure the best results can be found in this category.

If you have any links on good case studies where mobile permission marketing has been used for for a longer time, don’t hesitate to post a comment. I’d also like to hear any opinions you might have on mobility and marketing, post a comment or send e-mail to alindh at flyerone dot com.

—–>Follow us on Twitter too: @russellbuckley and @caaarlo

Permission & mobile-marketing

We’ve all read over the years many different explanations of what mobile marketing is, what can be done with it, and seen some case studies of cool and successful campaigns. Usually, these explanations follow a pretty similar pattern. The benefits of the media are described (personal, fast, ubiquitous, interactive, etc.), common use-cases are mentioned (customer acquisition&retention, sales promotion, direct marketing, crm, loyalty, etc.), technologies are described and somewhat hyped (mms, streaming video, lbs, etc.), and estimates of the market are given. This should all be familiar, so I won’t talk about these things. Instead I’d like to point out one important area that I think doesn’t get the attention it deserves.

Permission marketing

Gathering a committed audience that is willing to listen to you over time is, in my opinion, one of the most valuable marketing activities you can do. When using mobile technology as the channel for acquiring and activating this permission base, many of benefits of mobile marketing can be reaped. We’ve noticed that when combining an opt-in option as a part of a mobile campaign (i.e. when you’ve already gotten the dialogue going with an end-user), the opt-in percentages can be surprisingly high (of course there is substantial variation between different demographic segments, but when targeted correctly, the results are amazing).

A mobile strategy

But building a permission base is of course not enough. In order to maximize the potential of the permission base, you need to have a well thought out longer-term strategy on the activities targeted to the permission base. This is something we work on with many of our customers on a daily basis. Seth Godin has a good book on permission marketing that all marketers should read; it applies well on mobile marketing. Most of the mobile-marketing case-studies I’ve seen don’t analyze the longer term benefits of permission marketing, I’m however sure the best results can be found in this category.

If you have any links on good case studies where mobile permission marketing has been used for for a longer time, don’t hesitate to post a comment. I’d also like to hear any opinions you might have on mobility and marketing, post a comment or send e-mail to alindh at flyerone dot com.

—–>Follow us on Twitter too: @russellbuckley and @caaarlo

Permission & mobile-marketing

We’ve all read over the years many different explanations of what mobile marketing is, what can be done with it, and seen some case studies of cool and successful campaigns. Usually, these explanations follow a pretty similar pattern. The benefits of the media are described (personal, fast, ubiquitous, interactive, etc.), common use-cases are mentioned (customer acquisition&retention, sales promotion, direct marketing, crm, loyalty, etc.), technologies are described and somewhat hyped (mms, streaming video, lbs, etc.), and estimates of the market are given. This should all be familiar, so I won’t talk about these things. Instead I’d like to point out one important area that I think doesn’t get the attention it deserves.

Permission marketing

Gathering a committed audience that is willing to listen to you over time is, in my opinion, one of the most valuable marketing activities you can do. When using mobile technology as the channel for acquiring and activating this permission base, many of benefits of mobile marketing can be reaped. We’ve noticed that when combining an opt-in option as a part of a mobile campaign (i.e. when you’ve already gotten the dialogue going with an end-user), the opt-in percentages can be surprisingly high (of course there is substantial variation between different demographic segments, but when targeted correctly, the results are amazing).

A mobile strategy

But building a permission base is of course not enough. In order to maximize the potential of the permission base, you need to have a well thought out longer-term strategy on the activities targeted to the permission base. This is something we work on with many of our customers on a daily basis. Seth Godin has a good book on permission marketing that all marketers should read; it applies well on mobile marketing. Most of the mobile-marketing case-studies I’ve seen don’t analyze the longer term benefits of permission marketing, I’m however sure the best results can be found in this category.

If you have any links on good case studies where mobile permission marketing has been used for for a longer time, don’t hesitate to post a comment. I’d also like to hear any opinions you might have on mobility and marketing, post a comment or send e-mail to alindh at flyerone dot com.

—–>Follow us on Twitter too: @russellbuckley and @caaarlo